Parent Alcohol Abuse & Recovery

Alcohol Abuse Rehab

Adult Alcoholism | Statistics & Effects

Alcoholism is a serious disease and the problem is growing. The National Council On Alcoholism And Drug Dependence statistics reveal that approximately 18 million Americans abuse alcohol. Each year nearly 90,000 Americans die from alcohol related deaths. Alcohol-impaired driving accounts for more than 30 percent of all driving fatalities each year. Parent alcohol abuse effects an untold  number of children. Over half of the men and women in the United States report that one or more of their family members have a drinking problem.

The complications to the body from alcohol abuse may include damage to the brain and central nervous system, liver disorders, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular problems, diabetes complications, sexual and menstrual dysfunction, birth defects, neurological complications and increased risk of cancer.
There is no cure for alcoholism. Even if an alcoholic has long-term sobriety, he or she remains susceptible to relapse.

To insulate the Alcoholic and guard against a relapse, rehabilitated alcoholic’s should avoid drinking alcohol thru complete abstinence. There is treatment for the disease and a chance to build a healthier lifestyle. Addiction recovery treatment generally depends on the severity of alcoholism and abuse. It may include the following:

According to the National Institute On Alcohol Abuse And Alcoholism, alcoholism is a disease that has four main components:

  • Craving-an overwhelming need to drink
  • Loss of Control-An inability to put the drink down
  • Physical Dependence-After a period of heavy drinking withdrawal symptoms occur
    such as nausea, shaking, and anxiety
  • Tolerance-Needing greater amounts of alcohol to obtain a “high”

Some of the signs that a drinking problem exist include the following:

  • Feeling the need to cut down on drinking
  • Drinking alone
  • Annoyed by people criticizing your drinking
  • Feeling guilty about drinking
  • Not remembering conversations or “blacking out”
  • Losing interest in activities or hobbies that used to bring pleasure
  • Feeling the need to drink
  • Needing to drink first thing in the morning to relieve nerves or nurse a hangover
  • Becoming intoxicated to feel good
  • Building a tolerance to alcohol so that more alcohol is needed to feel its effects
  • Problems with relationships, employment, or finances as a result of drinking

The complications to the body from alcohol abuse may include damage to the brain and central nervous system, liver disorders, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular problems, diabetes complications, sexual and menstrual dysfunction, birth defects, neurological complications and increased risk of cancer.

There is no cure for alcoholism. Even if an alcoholic has long-term sobriety, he or she remains susceptible to relapse. To guard against a relapse, an alcoholic must avoid drinking alcohol. There is treatment for the disease and a chance to build a healthier lifestyle. Addiction recovery treatment generally depends on the severity of alcoholism and abuse. It may include the following:

  • Acceptance that a drinking problem exists
  • Detoxification and withdrawal-a process of safely removing alcohol from the body
    lasting from a period of days to weeks.
  • Assessment and treatment for medical problems related to physical damage from the
    disease
  • Drug treatment-some medications are used to reduce the craving for alcohol or to
    produce severe physical reactions such as nausea and vomiting if one drinks while on
    the medication. Drug treatments do not cure alcoholism nor will they remove the
    desire to drink.
  • Individual/Group Counseling-There are effective methods of counseling that help the
    alcoholic to identify feelings that trigger the urge to drink and alternatives to manage
    those feelings.

Alcohol Abuse | Treatment

Checking in to a drug rehab facility is an excellent method of treatment for parent alcohol abuse (parental alcoholism). There are many types of addiction recovery treatment facilities. Some offer detoxification and residential long-term inpatient treatment and others offer shorter-term residencies, sober living or outpatient counseling.

When researching drug rehabs, ask what treatment and services they provide such as detox, use of medications, individual/group counseling, staff physicians, nurses and counselors and treatment length. You may need to work with your own doctor and the drug rehab facility coordinator to determine the most appropriate method of treatment.

For more information – Call Toll-Free: (855) 99-PARTNER (855-997-2786)

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